I’ve been blogging about Ubuntu (and Linux in general I guess) for a veritable eon. So when news reached me that Getting Things GNOME is being revived I had to stop what I was doing and reach for a new draft.

This news has made me very excited.

Now, there’s a good chance that you’ve not actually heard of this app. That’s not surprising; the last stable release was over 6 years ago.

Y’know… Back when this site was cool 😉.

Getting Things GNOME (referred to as GTG hereon-in) is built around the Getting Things Done (GTD) methodology. What is GTD? It’s a proactive productivity template that has you complete tasks and work items in bitesize, actionable chunks.

This video distills the core points of the GTD principles quickly (and, as a bonus, is presented by GTG’s main developer):

GTG was the GTD app for Linux desktops back in 2009/10/11 and was explicitly but for this way of working.

I’m talking proper old school task management here. No fads, no flashy timers, and no abstract concepts. Just a rock solid focus on having you sort your to dos in a way that gets you to do them when they need doing.

Using GTD you take a task (e.g., “write a blog post”) and split it out in to individual, actionable subtasks (e.g., “pick a title”, “take screenshots”, “write an intro”, “make a thumbnail”, etc). You can organise and filter though subtasks using tags and due dates (which can be as specific or unspecific as you need).

Six years after its last stable release, the task management app for Linux is gearing up for a brand new release. It’s been rebuilt using GTK3 and Python 3, and sports a slick GTK Header Bar (aka CSD) to ensure it fits in flawlessly with modern Linux desktops, as this video overview details:

If you’re interested in using GTG and GTD before its upcoming stable release you can go hands-on with the code from master. You will find concise details on the GitHub project page:

See GTG on GitHub

GTG isn’t a sticky note pad for idle thoughts, but a fully-featured task management conduit. It makes you organise and delegate tasks into actionable items, and then makes it easy to do those items.

Ubuntu ships To Do (the GNOME task management app) by default and, competent though it is, there’s something just a bit off about it. It remains to be seen if this app can reconnect with users the way it once did, but I’m hopeful.

tl;dr GTG is being developed again and I’m excited.

Dev
#gtg #todoapps