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August’s Ubuntu App Chart Lacks Ubuntu Showdown Entries – But Why?

Minecraft Mod Installer ‘MC Launcher’ was August’s top selling app on the Ubuntu Software Center. 

The $2.99 tools allows for the easy installation of Java and Minecraft mods through a GUI.

Indie games continue to bulk out the chart, with Braid, Super Meat Boy, Bastion, Lone Survivor, LIMBO, Psychonauts and Amnesia: The Dark Descent all placing in the top 10.

Fluendo DVD Player, Oil Rush, and $20 ‘Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder‘ round out the July rankings.

August 2012′s Top 10 Commercial Apps in full: [App name (July position)]

  1. MC Launcher (new)
  2. Bastion (3)
  3. Amnesia: The Dark Descent (7)
  4. Oil Rush (re)
  5. Braid (1)
  6. LIMBO (5)
  7. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder (new)
  8. Fluendo DVD Player (9)
  9. Super Meat Boy (2)
  10. Psychonauts (6)

August 2012′s Top 10 Free Apps

Over on the free chart Electronic Art’s freemium titles remain popular, with Lord of Ultima re-entering the top 10 to claim 2nd place, though Command & Conquer Tiberium Alliances falls from 1st spot to 6th.

First place is claimed by ‘Master PDF Editor’. But is it truly a ‘top app’? Judging by the amount of 1-star reviews it’s received from users I would ager than its high placing could be by default rather than intention.

Elsewhere on the chart demand for science-fantasy MMORPG Ryzom remains strong, chalking up its 9th consecutive month in the top 10.

The top 10 ‘Free Apps’ in full: [Key: App name (July position)]

  1. Master PDF Editor (new)
  2. Lord of Ultima (re)
  3. IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition (3)
  4. Full Circle Magazine #61 (2)
  5. Plex Media Server (4)
  6. Command & Conquer: Tiberium Alliances (re)
  7. Ryzom (6)
  8. CrossOver Trial (5)
  9. XnViewMP (new)
  10. Getting Started with Ubuntu 12.04 (8)

No Show for the Showdown Apps

If you’re wondering where the newly crowned App Showdown winners are in the top 10 you wouldn’t be alone.

Given the substantial publicity and hype the three winning apps received one would have expected them to not only be in the top 10, but to have owned it.

But their omission is down to the which stats are collected, and what for what.

Free open-sources apps added to the Ubuntu Software Center by developers (such as the winners of the recent contest) are stocked in a repository called ‘Extra’. This repo doesn’t provide any download data whatsoever.

Free – but closed sourced or restricted – apps added are placed in their own ‘special’ archive from which data on downloads can be seen.

Which means if you’re an app developer delivering a free app on Ubuntu, you don’t have any chance of making the ‘Top 10 Free Apps’ chart.