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Integrating Wine Into Ubuntu With Vineyard

Wine gives users the perfect solution to switching OS – they can keep using a secure, free, totally rocking OS and still run some of their favourite Windows applications and games. Of course, Wine isn’t 100% perfect or compatible with every application, but the positive trade-off is often more than enough for most people.

The issue with Wine and Ubuntu, for those less familiar with the intricacies that using software via Wine can bring, are that they exist independently:

  • Wine software is managed via the Wine menu, Ubuntu software is managed via the Ubuntu Software Centre.
  • Wine is configured via WineCfg, Ubuntu is configured using applications in the System menu.
  • Ubuntu applications are in the Applications menu, Windows applications are in the Applications > Wine > Applications menu.

For users not prepared for this it can be extremely confusing.

Example: My Sister Vs. Spotify

My sister runs Ubuntu on her laptop. She’s not a geek, can’t tell an operating system from an orange but loved the sound of Ubuntu when i told her about it.

She wanted to install Spotify after hearing a friend rave about it, having searched the Ubuntu Software Center and not finding it she located the download page it from and proceeded to download it.

She was soon on the phone with another problem – when she double clicked the .exe file she was given an error…

image

“I normally get a window with a button that says install and then i put my password in…”

The current ‘error’ dialog isn’t helpful or informative in the slightest ” my sister is still left not knowing how to install her application and worse, why she couldn’t install it in the fist place.

To address this several proposals have been mooted. The most logical proposes to show the following pop-up when a user tries to install some Windows software: -

image

Alas, this has yet to be implemented as of 10.04 and the error-dialog is still present.

Configuring Wine With Vineyard

A new application called Vineyard gives users an impressively easy way to configure Wine and help provide tight integration between Wine and their GNOME desktop.

A new Wine configuration tool is inserted in your System > Preferences menu – a logical place for such an entry.

The application greatly simplifies and better presents common wine config options in a user-friendly way.

Left: Current WineCfg application; Right: Vineyard

Setting Sound preferences are a snap

Changing default Wine folders is a drag ‘n click affair

Oft-needed utilities are right on hand, too.

Compatibility off the bat

Right-clicking on a Wine application with Vineyard installed and heading to the properties menu now gives you quick access to configuring the application to run under a different compatibility mode, virtual desktop, etc.

Download

You install Vineyard from the following PPA: -

  • sudo add-apt-repository <Wine gives users the perfect solution to switching OS – they can keep using a secure, free, totally rocking OS and still run some of their favourite Windows applications and games. Of course, Wine isn’t 100% perfect or compatible with every application, but the positive trade-off is often more than enough for most people.

    The issue with Wine and Ubuntu, for those less familiar with the intricacies that using software via Wine can bring, are that they exist independently:

    • Wine software is managed via the Wine menu, Ubuntu software is managed via the Ubuntu Software Centre.
    • Wine is configured via WineCfg, Ubuntu is configured using applications in the System menu.
    • Ubuntu applications are in the Applications menu, Windows applications are in the Applications > Wine > Applications menu.

    For users not prepared for this it can be extremely confusing.

    Example: My Sister Vs. Spotify

    My sister runs Ubuntu on her laptop. She’s not a geek, can’t tell an operating system from an orange but loved the sound of Ubuntu when i told her about it.

    She wanted to install Spotify after hearing a friend rave about it, having searched the Ubuntu Software Center and not finding it she located the download page it from and proceeded to download it.

    She was soon on the phone with another problem – when she double clicked the .exe file she was given an error…

    image

    “I normally get a window with a button that says install and then i put my password in…”

    The current ‘error’ dialog isn’t helpful or informative in the slightest ” my sister is still left not knowing how to install her application and worse, why she couldn’t install it in the fist place.

    To address this several proposals have been mooted. The most logical proposes to show the following pop-up when a user tries to install some Windows software: -

    image

    Alas, this has yet to be implemented as of 10.04 and the error-dialog is still present.

    Configuring Wine With Vineyard

    A new application called Vineyard gives users an impressively easy way to configure Wine and help provide tight integration between Wine and their GNOME desktop.

    A new Wine configuration tool is inserted in your System > Preferences menu – a logical place for such an entry.

    The application greatly simplifies and better presents common wine config options in a user-friendly way.

    Left: Current WineCfg application; Right: Vineyard

    Setting Sound preferences are a snap

    Changing default Wine folders is a drag ‘n click affair

    Oft-needed utilities are right on hand, too.

    Compatibility off the bat

    Right-clicking on a Wine application with Vineyard installed and heading to the properties menu now gives you quick access to configuring the application to run under a different compatibility mode, virtual desktop, etc.

    Download

    You install Vineyard from the following PPA: -

    • sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cybolic/ppa<Wine gives users the perfect solution to switching OS – they can keep using a secure, free, totally rocking OS and still run some of their favourite Windows applications and games. Of course, Wine isn’t 100% perfect or compatible with every application, but the positive trade-off is often more than enough for most people.

      The issue with Wine and Ubuntu, for those less familiar with the intricacies that using software via Wine can bring, are that they exist independently:

      • Wine software is managed via the Wine menu, Ubuntu software is managed via the Ubuntu Software Centre.
      • Wine is configured via WineCfg, Ubuntu is configured using applications in the System menu.
      • Ubuntu applications are in the Applications menu, Windows applications are in the Applications > Wine > Applications menu.

      For users not prepared for this it can be extremely confusing.

      Example: My Sister Vs. Spotify

      My sister runs Ubuntu on her laptop. She’s not a geek, can’t tell an operating system from an orange but loved the sound of Ubuntu when i told her about it.

      She wanted to install Spotify after hearing a friend rave about it, having searched the Ubuntu Software Center and not finding it she located the download page it from and proceeded to download it.

      She was soon on the phone with another problem – when she double clicked the .exe file she was given an error…

      image

      “I normally get a window with a button that says install and then i put my password in…”

      The current ‘error’ dialog isn’t helpful or informative in the slightest ” my sister is still left not knowing how to install her application and worse, why she couldn’t install it in the fist place.

      To address this several proposals have been mooted. The most logical proposes to show the following pop-up when a user tries to install some Windows software: -

      image

      Alas, this has yet to be implemented as of 10.04 and the error-dialog is still present.

      Configuring Wine With Vineyard

      A new application called Vineyard gives users an impressively easy way to configure Wine and help provide tight integration between Wine and their GNOME desktop.

      A new Wine configuration tool is inserted in your System > Preferences menu – a logical place for such an entry.

      The application greatly simplifies and better presents common wine config options in a user-friendly way.

      Left: Current WineCfg application; Right: Vineyard

      Setting Sound preferences are a snap

      Changing default Wine folders is a drag ‘n click affair

      Oft-needed utilities are right on hand, too.

      Compatibility off the bat

      Right-clicking on a Wine application with Vineyard installed and heading to the properties menu now gives you quick access to configuring the application to run under a different compatibility mode, virtual desktop, etc.

      Download

      You install Vineyard from the following PPA: -

      • sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cybolic/ppa
      • <Wine gives users the perfect solution to switching OS – they can keep using a secure, free, totally rocking OS and still run some of their favourite Windows applications and games. Of course, Wine isn’t 100% perfect or compatible with every application, but the positive trade-off is often more than enough for most people.

        The issue with Wine and Ubuntu, for those less familiar with the intricacies that using software via Wine can bring, are that they exist independently:

        • Wine software is managed via the Wine menu, Ubuntu software is managed via the Ubuntu Software Centre.
        • Wine is configured via WineCfg, Ubuntu is configured using applications in the System menu.
        • Ubuntu applications are in the Applications menu, Windows applications are in the Applications > Wine > Applications menu.

        For users not prepared for this it can be extremely confusing.

        Example: My Sister Vs. Spotify

        My sister runs Ubuntu on her laptop. She’s not a geek, can’t tell an operating system from an orange but loved the sound of Ubuntu when i told her about it.

        She wanted to install Spotify after hearing a friend rave about it, having searched the Ubuntu Software Center and not finding it she located the download page it from and proceeded to download it.

        She was soon on the phone with another problem – when she double clicked the .exe file she was given an error…

        image

        “I normally get a window with a button that says install and then i put my password in…”

        The current ‘error’ dialog isn’t helpful or informative in the slightest ” my sister is still left not knowing how to install her application and worse, why she couldn’t install it in the fist place.

        To address this several proposals have been mooted. The most logical proposes to show the following pop-up when a user tries to install some Windows software: -

        image

        Alas, this has yet to be implemented as of 10.04 and the error-dialog is still present.

        Configuring Wine With Vineyard

        A new application called Vineyard gives users an impressively easy way to configure Wine and help provide tight integration between Wine and their GNOME desktop.

        A new Wine configuration tool is inserted in your System > Preferences menu – a logical place for such an entry.

        The application greatly simplifies and better presents common wine config options in a user-friendly way.

        Left: Current WineCfg application; Right: Vineyard

        Setting Sound preferences are a snap

        Changing default Wine folders is a drag ‘n click affair

        Oft-needed utilities are right on hand, too.

        Compatibility off the bat

        Right-clicking on a Wine application with Vineyard installed and heading to the properties menu now gives you quick access to configuring the application to run under a different compatibility mode, virtual desktop, etc.

        Download

        You install Vineyard from the following PPA: -

        • sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cybolic/ppa
        • sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install vineyard